Opinion

President Donald Trump holds a joint news conference with Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni at the White House on April 20, 2017.

Donald Trump isn't learning from his mistakes

By David Gergen, CNN Senior Political Analyst
As they brace for harsh media attacks on their first 100 days, President Donald Trump's team points out with justification that other presidents have stumbled, too.
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What the French elections mean for Americans

By David A. Andelman
David A. Andelman writes that while Emmanuel Macron would strengthen US-French relations, Marine Le Pen would have the opposite effect, choosing instead to align with Russia.

Hero emerges on American Airlines video

By Danny Cevallos, CNN Legal Analyst
The latest incident on American Airlines highlights the important role cell phone cameras play in holding airlines accountable for their treatment of passengers, writes Danny Cevallos.
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French far-right Front National party's President Marine Le Pen is waiting before she votes in the first round of 2017 French presidential election at a polling station on April 23 in Henin-Beaumont, northern France.

Why Putin and Trump both like Le Pen

By Dean Obeidallah
On one hand, Donald Trump's praise of France's far right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen, who appears to have received enough votes in Sunday's election to advance to the May 7 runoff, is not surprising. Le Pen, like Trump, ran a campaign that was anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim and traded on white supremacist themes. (It's no coincidence that former Klan leader David Duke has publicly praised both Le Pen and Trump.)
Passengers board the SS St. Louis.

How will the White House remember the Holocaust?

By Rebecca Kobrin
Monday is Yom Hashoah, the day designated in 1953 by the State of Israel to commemorate the murder of millions of Jews during the Second World War. Selected to mark the anniversary of the 1943 Warsaw ghetto uprising, this day is meant to impart a lesson: Jews should be remembered not only for dying in the Holocaust, but for fighting for their lives as well.
Bill Nye March for Science

Bill Nye: Science made America great

By Bill Nye
The US has become the most powerful nation on Earth and among the greatest in history, because it has long respected and promoted science. Science is being actively undermined by ideological forces motivated to maintain the status quo rather than advance the nation's long-term interest, says Bill Nye.

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Political Op-eds 

    Give President Trump the chance that Ronald Reagan got

    By Tom Barrack
    Tom Barrack, a friend of the president, writes that if people stop judging Trump and his administration on every word that is uttered, every hour, and instead hold him accountable over time for the implementation of policies under which he ran, confusion might turn to clarity.

Social commentary 

  • BERLIN - JANUARY 18:  Different kinds of vegetables, including paprikas, zucchini, onions and tomatoes, lie on display at a government stand that offers information on nutrition at the Gruene Woche agricultural trade fair January 18, 2008 in Berlin, Germany. The Gruene Woche runs from January 18 through 27.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

    Go vegan, save the planet

    By George C. Wang
    Choosing plant-based diets can promote environmental sustainability and make the world better for generations to come, says George Wang
  • I got bumped from a flight. Then I sued

    By Thatcher A. Stone
    Aviation lawyer Thatcher Stone says the United story has two lessons: passengers must follow instructions of flight crews and airlines need to follow the rules on bumping

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Two° 

    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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